AGU Meeting Sessions of Interest to Information Professionals

Although the fall meeting (December 13-17,  San Francisco)  of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) is primarily of interest to geophysicists, several of the sessions are of interest to information professionals.  These include:

  • IN02: Enabling and Encouraging Transparency in Science Data
    A number of events and publications have highlighted the need for a high degree of transparency and best practices in the publication, management, provenance tracking, traceability, identification, and citability of science data, and particularly for Earth Science data.  Motivation to publish data also comes from publisher and funding agency mandates to make data accessible and a desire to give greater credit for the sharing of data. This session is for the tools, approaches, and cultural changes to increase the transparency of scientific work, improve the analysis of the impact of data sharing, and provide credit for researchers and institutions openly sharing data.
  • IN11:   Collaborative Frameworks in Earth and Space Sciences
    The rise of social media in all aspects of society has spurred similar developments in the conduct of scientific research. Social media frameworks promise to make collaboration among scientists a rich, continual, free-flowing, farflung process, hopefully accelerating the pace of scientific progress. This session seeks papers describing the application of collaborative frameworks within Earth and Space sciences.  Potential topics include, but are not limited to: use of social media for science research, technologies (e.g., Drupal) for implementing frameworks, approaches to crowdsourcing data collection and analysis, and challenges such as trust issues and recruitment of participants.
  • U17: Enabling and Encouraging Transparency in Science Data, and for Information Integration.
    A number of events and publications have highlighted the need for a high degree of transparency and best practices in the publication, management, provenance tracking, traceability, identification, and citability of science data, and particularly for Earth Science data. In addition, the importance of free, open, authoritative sources of quality data that are available for peer review and for collaborative purposes is increasing rapidly. Motivation to share and publish data also comes from publisher and funding agency mandates to make data accessible and a desire to give greater credit for the sharing of data.  Focus will be on applications and opportunities for enhancing existing and common community-agreed data exchange standards for use with Earth and space science data.  Requirements include tools, approaches, and cultural  changes.  The goal is to increase the transparency of scientific work, improve the analysis of the impact of data sharing, and provide credit for researchers and institutions openly sharing data.

Don Hawkins
Columnist, Information Today and Conference Circuit Blog Editor

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